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Flynn Hawkins is a graduate assistant at a prestigious university, on his way to greatness and wisdom. But in the aftermath of 9/11, Flynn leaves his unhappy marriage and beloved children, resigns his teaching position and heads west, only to get lost in his guilt and in the mountains of Colorado. When he ends up stuck overnight in a snow drift during a blizzard on the Continental Divide, he realizes he needs to remake himself into the kind of man his children need him to be.

With wit and insight, David Hicks turns a compassionate but unblinking eye on what it means to be human—to be lost while putting yourself back together again, to be cowardly while being brave, to fail and fail again on the way to something that might be success.

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Evoking the Western drama of Cormac McCarthy, the family sensibility of Kent Haruf, and the wacky, magical humor of Christopher Moore, McBrearty displays his storytelling prowess and wit in his debut novel. In his debut novel, Pushcart Prize winner Robert Garner McBrearty spins a hilarious, poignant, over-the-top Western. In it, Jim O’Brien writes the quixotic saga of his ancestors who grew up with a tribe of Comanches. As his grip on reality loosens, O’Brien weaves into the tale modern day stalkers, drug dealers, secret agents, strippers, a mad linguist, an imaginary therapist, Ernest Hemingway, and an RV trip through the soul of the West. Having been displaced, each of the characters must embark on the Great American Quest for a place to truly call home.

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A modern-day, real life adventure, this book will take readers along for a rollicking ride through South America on a race to the bottom of the Earth. When the author first met Polish explorer, Yurek Majcherczyk on a commercial feasibility expedition down Ecuador’s Quijos River in 1989, he did not know it would lead to taking part in a Polish race, stumbling upon a mummy-filled cave and even getting wrapped up in a legend linking long-lost Incan riches to a riverfront castle in Poland. As the adventurers plunge deeper and deeper into unknown territory, they discover a rival Polish team trying to usurp their goal.

The author seamlessly weaves these tales with his own exploits and adventures-climaxing with a tumultuous hike out of the canyon with both teams returning to complete their race the following year. Comrades on the Colca was a finalist for the 2017 Foreword Review INDIES Award

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Winner of the 2013 Colorado Book Award for Literary Fiction - a poignant, darkly comic debut novel about a father and son finding their way together as their livelihood inexorably disappears

“This is writing on a par with that of top-flight black-comic novelists like Sam Lipsyte and Jess Walter, and it deserves to be read.”—Lev Grossman, bestselling author of The Magicians

When Stacey “Shakespeare” Williams returns to the family farm in eastern Colorado to bury his dead cat, he finds his widowed father, Emmett, living in squalor. There’s no money, the land is fallow, and a local banker has cheated the senile Emmett out of the majority of the farm equipment and his beloved Cessna.

Unemployed and without prospects, Shakespeare settles in as caretaker to both his dad and the farm while simultaneously getting drawn into an unlikely clique of former classmates. Threatened with the farm’s foreclosure, Shakespeare, Emmett, and his misfit friends hatch a half-serious plot to rob the very bank that stole their future.

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Nine years ago, Jack Erikson was deployed to China to protect the United States from a cyberattack. Now, suffering from a drug-induced amnesia, he is unable to recognize his own son. What Jack knows for sure is that an elite group of operators is determined to kill him. What he does not yet remember is that he controls a cyber weapon powerful enough to return human civilization to the Stone Age. If Jack lives long enough to piece together his mission and his identity, he will be forced to choose between the fate of humankind and that of his own family.

Readers of Cormac McCarthy and Peter Heller will appreciate the suspense and the Western setting. In his thrilling literary debut, Benjamin Dancer also explores the timeless themes of fatherhood and the fraying fabric of global stability

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Lost Sheep: Aspen’s Counterculture in the 1970s–A Memoir recounts the author’s journey from the “real” world of 1970s America to the rollicking, freedom-loving, outlaw world of Aspen. Blending personal narrative, local history, dramatic interlude, and cultural analysis, the story begins as a literal journey but quickly evolves into the memoir of an entire town–a time and place many consider to be Aspen’s “Golden Age,” when artists, eccentrics, and outlaws took over the city and transformed it into an alpine bohemia.

The noteworthy cast of characters–famous, infamous, and unknown–includes Claudine Longet, Jack Nicholson, Dr. Hunter S. Thompson, Steve Martin, and Ted Bundy. The local residents are even more colorful, from a woman who feeds her dog nothing but vegetables to a bookstore owner who believes in “psychic surgeries,” while everywhere art is being made–and a good deal of hay.

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A blend of fact, fiction, politics, and intimacy this poetry book chronicles a forgotten episode in American history and prefigure today's immigration debates. Between 1910 and 1940, Chinese immigrants to America were detained at the Angel Island Immigration Station in the San Francisco Bay. As they waited for weeks and months to know if they could land, some of the detainees wrote poems on the walls. All the poems on record were found in the men's barracks; the women's quarters were destroyed by a fire. The collection imagines the lost voices of the detained women, while also telling the stories of their families on shore, the staff at Angel Island, and the 1877 San Francisco Chinatown Riot.

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Columbine The result of 15 years of research and exclusive information, this is the first book of investigative journalism to tell the complete story of Littleton, Colorado's 1999 mass shooting, its far-reaching consequences, and common characteristics among public shooters across the country. A classic in the tradition of "In Cold Blood "and "The Executioner's Song," it comprehensively explores fundamental American themes of violence, racism, parenting, and policing. This updated and revised edition concludes with new material about public shootings since Columbine and how communities can stop such horrific events from happening in the future.